A New Kind of Country

A New Kind of Country Novelist Dorothy Gilman author of the bestselling Mrs Pollifax series had reached a point of no return in her life With her sons in college Ms Gilman was searching for something unknowable unnamea

  • Title: A New Kind of Country
  • Author: Dorothy Gilman
  • ISBN: 9780449216279
  • Page: 374
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Novelist Dorothy Gilman, author of the bestselling Mrs Pollifax series, had reached a point of no return in her life With her sons in college, Ms Gilman was searching for something unknowable, unnameable until she bought a small house in a little lobstering village in Nova Scotia, Canada.And so she began her life again, discovering talents and interests she neverNovelist Dorothy Gilman, author of the bestselling Mrs Pollifax series, had reached a point of no return in her life With her sons in college, Ms Gilman was searching for something unknowable, unnameable until she bought a small house in a little lobstering village in Nova Scotia, Canada.And so she began her life again, discovering talents and interests she never realized were hers, accepting the inner peace she had always fought, and most of all, understanding the untapped part of herself, almost as if it were a new kind of country, to challenge, explore, and love.

    One thought on “A New Kind of Country”

    1. Somewhat memoir, about Gilman herself. Also somewhat philosophy, esp. about a woman living alone. It's also a bit about village life in general, and lobstermen in particular. Beautifully written. I won't say it's 'like' Michael Perry but I will say I'm experiencing the same kind of joy in, and admiration for, the writing that I do when I read his essays. Still relevant, 4 decades on, at least to women of a certain age. I know we're making progress, but I was raised, in some ways, much the same a [...]

    2. I have given this book about fifty times but it is hard to come by these days. It is the story of a woman who had to find a place in order to find herself. Be care - many have left their boring lives and struck out to claim something new and better. It is a hell of a read.

    3. I first read Dorothy Gilman’s Mrs Pollifax mysteries around the time that my youngest child left home for college. Mrs. Pollifax was a good role model then – a widow with grown children, choosing where life would take her next. Now, at a time when all of my children have left home for good, I have read Dorothy Gilman’s own story, of moving to Nova Scotia from the New York suburbs after her youngest leaves home for college and getting to know herself for perhaps the first time in her life. [...]

    4. Interesting introspective from 1978. Dorothy Gilman packed her stressed out self off from a suburb near NYC to a remote village in Nova Scotia, her insightful reflections are worth the read.Some things in this country have changed in 40/50 years, some things have not and that, too, is interesting. (Wonder how the village in Nova Scotia has fared).For me the most interesting and valuable aspect of the book is the reminder that living minimally and close to nature is healing to both body and mind. [...]

    5. I wish I had written this review when I finished the book a few months ago. It's very much a snapshot in her time of when she was a no longer married woman in the 70s whose kids have grown up who learns to find herself apart from the others by going to the coast of Nova Scotia and having a go at a garden. Which sounds perhaps cheesy or red-hat-ladies-esque, but which was actually quite lovely in a quiet and honest way.

    6. Just finished re-reading this book and it never ceases to amaze me how stories of personal discovery are timeless. She wrote this quite awhile ago and yet I found it relevant and wise.

    7. This was such a revelation. Far different from her other books (which I also love). A memoir I didn't want to end. Something I could never have imagined. I want to read it again!

    8. This book changed my life when I first read it 20 yrs. ago. I now own it and have recently re-read it and it provoked more deep thinking about myself.

    9. I love Dorothy Gilman's fiction. Mrs. Polifax is a hero of mine. I wanted to gain some insight into the author's life to understand where she was coming from. This is not that kind of a book. Not a biography, but a philosophical memoir. Her discussions about the meaning of life and the nature of solitude sometimes caused me to overthink, a bad habit of mine, and lose sleep as in the middle of the night I pondered my own life."It is when the mind has quieted and we have died to those thoughts tha [...]

    10. I can't believe I was surprised to find that Dorothy Gilman was a feminist. Well, duh. Anyone who has met Mrs. Pollifax would be able to figure that out.I am sometimes disappointed when I read a memoir or biography of someone whose work I admire but not so this time. I think I would have enjoyed knowing her and I will in the future read her books with a slightly different mind set.Thanks to Diane for bringing my attention to this one.

    11. This is along the lines of Taber's Stillmeadow Daybook, and is about Ms. Gilman's move to Nova Scotia after a life of city & suburban dwelling. It consists mostly of sketches rather than plot - little depth about the adjustments of the move or the resultant philosophical changes. Some of each are there, but not a lot. Enjoyable, but not revealing enough to be moving. Good, but not as good as it could have been.

    12. A memoir of living alone in the wilds of Nova Scotia in the 1960s when to do so as a woman was a revolutionary act. By the author of the wonderful Mrs Pollifax "cozy" mysteries. Beautiful writing and some interesting insights, but a lot of it is dated, like speculations about the I Ching and ESP (for goodness sakes!).

    13. An interesting quick read about how Gilman moved to Nova Scotia in order to be alone, only to realize that she would discover herself there. Very similar in many ways to Anne Lindbergh's Gift from the Sea.

    14. I was interested in the premise but disappointed with the results. Very little in details of gardening, Nova Scotia, and self-reliance; much on being lost in middle age and finding a purpose in life. A little too "Jonathon Living Seagull" for me. Very 70's slant to the author's perpective.

    15. Gilman states some important things very plainly and cleanly - she's a great advocate for simplicity and autonomy. The book could be more tightly focused, and I was repulsed by one chapter of total New Age gibberish, but the book makes a short and sweet antidote to consumerism.

    16. This book saved my life way back when it came outa story In itselfars later I wrote ms. Gilman and thanked herShe very graciously replied

    17. To me it was a cross between the first Boxcar Children book & Lindbergh's "Gift from the Sea." A fun read about an author I have long enjoyed.

    18. This book explores the life of dear Dorothy Gilman. Her books are easily read and always interesting and informative.I would like to have a copy of this one!!

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