Internal Dialogue

Internal Dialogue Internal dialogue is the voice inside our heads that we can t ignore even when we want to We second guess ourselves pass judgment on the world around us and are at our most emotionally vulnerable A

  • Title: Internal Dialogue
  • Author: Marcy Kennedy
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 149
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Internal dialogue is the voice inside our heads that we can t ignore, even when we want to We second guess ourselves, pass judgment on the world around us, and are at our most emotionally vulnerable And the same needs to be true for our characters Internal dialogue is one of the most powerful tools in a fiction writer s arsenal It s an advantage we have over TV and movInternal dialogue is the voice inside our heads that we can t ignore, even when we want to We second guess ourselves, pass judgment on the world around us, and are at our most emotionally vulnerable And the same needs to be true for our characters Internal dialogue is one of the most powerful tools in a fiction writer s arsenal It s an advantage we have over TV and movie script writers and playwrights It s also one of the least understood and most often mismanaged elements of the writing craft In Internal Dialogue A Busy Writer s Guide, you ll learn the difference between internal dialogue and narration, best practices for formatting internal dialogue, ways to use internal dialogue to advance your story, how to balance internal dialogue with external action, clues to help you decide whether you re overusing or underusing internal dialogue, tips for dealing with questions in your internal dialogue, and much Each book in the Busy Writer s Guide series is intended to give you enough theory so that you can understand why things work and why they don t, but also enough examples to see how that theory looks in practice In addition, they provide tips and exercises to help you take it to the pages of your own story, with an editor s eye view Most importantly, they cut the fluff so that you have time to write and to live your life.

    One thought on “Internal Dialogue”

    1. Many books for writers focus on big elements like plot and characters, but sometimes what makes those elements work or not are the techniques the author uses. And books with hands-on, detailed, break-it-down-to-the-nitty-gritty techniques are rare.Even rarer are those books that do it well. This book is on that very short list. :)I've read several of Marcy's Busy Writer's Guides books, and they're all great for those detailed techniques. However, the topic of this book--internal dialogue--is mor [...]

    2. It had good points to consider when it comes to internal dialogue but as someone who writes primarily in first person, there was not much to work with. It was heavily focused on third person POV which got old fast.

    3. O que é, como usar para avançar enredo e revelar personagem, como formatar e editar, como saber quando está em excesso ou em falta na história.Essa série de livros da autora é fantástica. Recomendo também Mastering Showing and Telling in Your Fiction e How to Write Dialogue.

    4. An excellent, brief and to-the-point lesson on how to use internal dialogue. Kennedy packs the book with a variety of examples (both good and bad) as well as detailed tips on how to revise your own work-in-progress for internal dialogue issues. This was my first "Busy Writer's Guide" but won't be my last.

    5. I don't know Marcy Kennedy, but I am an avid follower of her craft books. I don't want to think about how many craft books I've bought in the past that sit shamefully on my shelf unread. I cannot say that about any of her books. She truly knows her stuff.

    6. Very helpful and practical guide! I see what she means by writing straight to the point and cutting out all the fluff in a writing guide. It really does respect the busy writer's time. :)As a person who writes in the omniscient POV (this POV is the norm in my genre), I'm very grateful that Marcy covered how to handle the omniscient as well, especially as not everyone in the writing community even respects or appreciates this type of POV in the first place. :(The many examples from books illustra [...]

    7. Very helpful!! I tend to read authors who are "rule breakers" and I think that's WHY I like them so much, but when it comes to my own writing, every great tip is a blessing. This is not the first book on dialogue I've read, but I found suggestions in here that helped me solve a few problems I had with group settings in scenes and how to assign dialogue to whom and when. I also feel better about not including 'said' at the end/beginning of dialogue between two people. Listening to someone reading [...]

    8. I picked up this book because I know I can be a bit wordy and can navel-gaze for twenty thousand words before a character gets out of their bed. I wanted to see what I could learn and if I could pick up any tips that would make my internal dialogue between the dialog and active narrative sharper and effective.If you find that you have trouble with this, go for it.The only thing I didn't agree with was Kennedy saying that inserting "he thought" or "she thought" is unnecessary in 3rd person limite [...]

    9. A Great Craft BookI found this book to be one of most helpful guides to writing better fiction. Internal dialogue can be tricky. Marcy Kennedy is thorough in explaining the dos and don'ts of how to best utilize it. Not only does she systematically teach you to write great internal dialogue, but she clearly describes issues surrounding point of view and follows it all up with how to edit your manuscript as easily as possible. I will definitely be purchasing more Busy Writer's Guides in the future [...]

    10. Why do I bother buying these little books, when they tell me things I already know? I don't write a lot of internal dialogue, instead making the characters speak for themselves. If I do too much internal dialogue, I get stuck in their heads, and then the action is gone. Although this book does give good hints on how to change something from narration to internal dialogue, you may end up spending way too much time in someone's head.

    11. Another great reference book!This is a great, in-depth guide to how and when to effectively use internal dialogue. She also explains when there is too much or not enough internal dialogue. A link to a printable checklist is also available for download. A great reference during the editing phase!

    12. This is a to the point book with good tips on internal dialogue and also with helpful checklists for revision.

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