Because the Cat Purrs: How We Relate to Other Species and Why it Matters

Because the Cat Purrs How We Relate to Other Species and Why it Matters A new book by Janet Lembke is always a cause for celebration Sue Hubbell We share our lives for better or worse with a multitude of animals white tailed deer and white tailed eagles hens and wrens

  • Title: Because the Cat Purrs: How We Relate to Other Species and Why it Matters
  • Author: Janet Lembke
  • ISBN: 9781602392359
  • Page: 270
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A new book by Janet Lembke is always a cause for celebration Sue Hubbell We share our lives, for better or worse, with a multitude of animals, white tailed deer and white tailed eagles, hens and wrens, frogs and guppies, and, last but hardly least, bugs and bacteria For the most part, we drift along separately, with neither man nor animal affecting the other s way of l A new book by Janet Lembke is always a cause for celebration Sue Hubbell We share our lives, for better or worse, with a multitude of animals, white tailed deer and white tailed eagles, hens and wrens, frogs and guppies, and, last but hardly least, bugs and bacteria For the most part, we drift along separately, with neither man nor animal affecting the other s way of life Sometimes, however, we fall in love as in the case of the cat in the title or otherwise encounter our animal neighbors in ways that change both of us Lembke challenges her readers to consider the idea that all creatures are conscious, with the ability to make choices, exercise awareness, and seek pleasure while shunning pain Rarely has a book of natural history covered such a broad range of subjects, from the everyday bargains we make with our pets and other domestic creatures to descriptions of bungee cord snail sex and the purpose of a honeybee s sting Lembke explores the evolution of her subjects, and draws on literature and myth to paint gorgeous, wide ranging portraits of everyday and unusual encounters, such as that of a gardener and a groundhog, or a chicken egg and Augustus Caesar s wife This is a sensitive and timely appraisal of how we treat the creatures we share our planet with and how we ought to It is a book that no lover of intelligent writing about the natural world will want to miss 20 b w illustrations.

    One thought on “Because the Cat Purrs: How We Relate to Other Species and Why it Matters”

    1. The subtitle of this book, "How We Relate to Other Species and Why It Matters," misled me. I anticipated a broad spectrum book about human-animal relations, perhaps discussing specific instances with particular animals but only as they relate back to the larger whole. Therefore, I was pleasantly surprised by being completely off the mark. This is a charming tale of fourteen (and a few more) species that the author has related with during the course of her daily life. The book is laced with inter [...]

    2. When I pick up a book called Because the Cat Purrs which has an adorable, fuzzy blue-eyed kitten on the cover I expect a feel good account of animals and the humans who love them. When I read an encounter between a vehicle and a deer where the driver puts the unconscious animal in the back seat I assume she is seeking help, but let me quote from the book: "He came to with a great flailing of hooves Fortunately---or unfortunately, depending on the point of view---she and her husband were able to [...]

    3. There's some interesting information in here, but the author is so irrepressibly cute about constructing sentences that it's a chore to tease it out. Here's a random paragraph:"Two questions regarding chickens crop up persistently: Why did the chicken cross the road? And, which came first, the chicken or the egg? One reasonable answer to the second is: the dinosaur came first. And the dinosaur was, like the feathered versions produced by evolution, an egg-laying creature. As for the first questi [...]

    4. I saw this book at the library and the cute fuzzy kitty made me pick it up. I'm such a sucker for cute kitty things so the book designer totally got me on this one. I thought the book would deal more with why our relationships to animals matter but it was an enjoyable book nonetheless. I learned a lot about the different animals and plants we are aware of in our everyday lives from cats, deer, birds, slugs and snails, bugs, mice, maple trees and intestinal beings. Being a vegetarian some of the [...]

    5. An interesting premise, but I disagree with the execution. The author sprinkled in some interesting facts, but wandered from history to personal anecdotes to breeding habits without really bringing me along. She's a little too self-indulgent in her writing style -- at one point, discussing E. coli, she launched into a description of a pediatrician who studied it, and exclaimed: "d his whiskers, oh, his whiskers!" I couldn't care less; get back to the E. coli, please.Judgments on whether our rela [...]

    6. This book is an interesting set of essays detailing the complexities of human-animal behavior and interactions. The subjects of the essays range from groundhogs, carpenter bees, white-tail deer, chickens, turtles, and, of course, the purring cats. The author's inclusion of writings from authors in ancient Greece and Rome (translated by herself) indicates her other passion, along with a gardening obsession. Some of the stories will stay with me for a while--the turtle who bumped her shell against [...]

    7. I really liked this book; the only criticism I could find is that Ms Lembke seems to be very concerned with the Latin name and the family tree of each animal species. Just my opinion, but I wouldn't have needed that to complete the stories. It made the stories a little tedious in places. Other than that, it was a great book filled with her (and others') interactions with a wide variety of creatures.

    8. Pretty good book. This book about the relationships were share with other organisms (from turtles to beetles to bacteria) is set up with a chapter devoted to each relationship. The author was able to open my eyes to the ways in which we interact with so many different organisms. Different perceptions were presented through anecdotal stories.Easy reading that provides insight and an opportunity to learn something new.

    9. I learned that purring may increase bone density, ease pain, and promote healing in cats. Also, slugs are hermaphrodites (but they mate anyway, and rabbits eat their own poop.I was dismayed at how often the author referred to killing of the animals she discussed, in some inhuman ways. Why was it necessary? And I did not enjoy the recipe for venison.

    10. Author lives in or near Staunton. It is a good book, sort of backyard naturalist. I don't know that I agree with everything that she says, but it is a good read. I prefer Virginia Morrell's book on this subject.

    11. not very cohesive. authors point in the title and intro doesn't seem to really reflect the organisms chosen. too much bias to pests

    12. A look at the everyday animals in our lives. My only complaint is the layout the background and super big typeface for the first pages of a new chapter are ugly and hard on the eyes.

    13. Fun book discussing why we react the way we do to cats, mice, certain weeds, etc. Quick read, except there's quite a bit of freshman biology in the preface.

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