Jamila Does Not Want a Bat in Her House

Jamila Does Not Want a Bat in Her House It s not that Jamila minds the bat It s where the bat IS that bothers Jamila She knows that bats do not belong inside She does not want a bat inside her house And she is certain that bats do not belon

  • Title: Jamila Does Not Want a Bat in Her House
  • Author: Phyllis Edgerly Ring Leona Hosack
  • ISBN: 9780877437185
  • Page: 497
  • Format: Hardcover
  • It s not that Jamila minds the bat It s where the bat IS that bothers Jamila She knows that bats do not belong inside She does not want a bat inside her house And she is certain that bats do not belong inside anyone s house for Nineteen Day Feast Join Jamila and her family as they work together using prayer, consultation, and action to try and get the bat outsideIt s not that Jamila minds the bat It s where the bat IS that bothers Jamila She knows that bats do not belong inside She does not want a bat inside her house And she is certain that bats do not belong inside anyone s house for Nineteen Day Feast Join Jamila and her family as they work together using prayer, consultation, and action to try and get the bat outside where it belongs This book is available for purchase from the publisher at bahaibookstore Jamila Or ask for it at your favorite bookstore.

    One thought on “Jamila Does Not Want a Bat in Her House”

    1. This beautifully illustrated book of African Americans in a positive light was a delight to read. It showed Jamila dealing with and conquering her fear, in this case, a bat. It deals with prayer, family, working together and community. Although I am Christian, it showed other spiritual principles such as family worship and community fellowship. I think it is a good book for any child. I would like to read other works by this author. I won this book in a giveaway.

    2. In this sweet children's book, a bat flying around the house grabs our attention right off the "bat." Jamila is our heroine. She and her family's problem-solving attempts and final resolution make it a fun read. Of course the bat is the antagonist, but not a malevolent one, just another (probably) frightened being trapped in the wrong place. I love how the author makes all her characters sympathetic, even the bat. And of course, lessons are learned by all. In this book are excellent examples of [...]

    3. -Disclaimer: I won this book for free through giveaways in exchange for an honest review.- Right of the 'bat' I didn't care for the book. The idea that someone doesn't want a bat in their houseseems rather obvious. Most people don't like bats but that aside I couldn't find much anything I enjoyed about the book. This was another instance where someone turned a random occurrence religious when it didn't need to be religious. It starts off with a prayer from a book I've never heard of nor do I ag [...]

    4. "Jamila Does Not Want a Bat in Her House" is a delightful children's book. It is well illustrated by Leona Hosack and the drawings are alive, informative and fun. The author Phyllis Edgerly Ring provides the reader with a story that will captivate young children being read to, as well as give new readers a book they can handle and enjoy. The story is a universal one and can appeal to all children, although the heroine, Jamila, and her family are members of the Baha'i Faith and preparing for a Ba [...]

    5. This book was so cute and a great example of caring, compassion and team work. It is a definite good read for an early reader or for tutoring young kids. I have read this book a couple of times to my grandson (a year and a half) and he finds it to be funny and entertaining. This book will be kept in my collection for my literacy tutoring and to help my 5 year old progress in her reading skills. Phyllis Edgerly Ring has done a great job of using this book to explain a custom that (I) am unfamilia [...]

    6. Jamila Does Not Want a Bat in Her House is a sweet children's story. A bat is loose in Jamila's house and Jamila is afraid, but using prayer and teamwork her family is able to get the bat out of the house. The illustrations are pleasant and work well to tell the tale. The family in this book practice Bahá'í. This doesn't make the book inaccessible to those of other religions. The prayer Jamila uses to help capture the bat is one that will feel familiar to many religions. This book can serve as [...]

    7. This charming book instantly captivated my young daughters, who reenacted the story after just one reading. Jamila, quite sensibly does not want a bat in her house and the author and illustrator convey so well how fearful events are so very distracting and how courage, at first, can be hard to come by. The story importantly reminds us, parents included, that we all react differently to the unexpected, and because of this, we all have a role to play in problem-solving. With cooperation, resoluten [...]

    8. I loved this book . I read it to my great grandchildren who immediately understood Jamila's fear.Who wouldn't fear a swooping bat? "How will they get him out ?" they wanted to know.It took the family with Jamila to help her face the bat problem and open a window.So often letting the problem go can be the best solution.Beautiful illustrations of the whole process of Baha'i prayer, commitment , love of other fill this book.

    9. Jamila and her family try to rid their house of a bat. Jamila is a little frightened of the bat and she prays for help to set the bat free especially since they are preparing for the Nineteen-Day Feast. I thought the book was sweet and was introduced to a new religion that I had never heard of before.I received this book free of charge through in exchange for my review.

    10. A GoodReads GiveAwayThis is a children's book. Afraid at first, Jamila comes to appreciate the bat's plight. (And, hey, I know what it is like to have a bat in my house. I did not want it either.)Children's books are brief but I will read this book again and again — I have granddaughters.

    11. This is such a great story! It calls on fears we all can have and validates them for the reader. Jamila is anxious about the bat but ultimately learns the bat is also afraid and the resolution happens as a result of teamwork. I also love how small elements of the Baha'i faith are incorporated without alienating those who might not know about the faith. The illustrations show the emotions of those involved and include lots of little details which bring the story to life. I wish this were more wid [...]

    12. This book would be good to add to your child’s/classroom’s library to increase diversity. The author uses the bat story to help children learn about some of the Baha’ i faiths teachings (patience, perseverance and working together) and the Nineteen Day Feast. So this book is functional as a teaching tool, but I found the story line a little boring. I didn’t care for this book as an adult, but my 5 year old was very interested.

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