Taxi!: A Social History of the New York City Cabdriver

Taxi A Social History of the New York City Cabdriver Naturally identified with the Big Apple New York City cabdrivers hold a special place in the American folk culture writ large Cabbies proverbially counsel console and confound all the while flitti

  • Title: Taxi!: A Social History of the New York City Cabdriver
  • Author: Graham Russell Gao Hodges
  • ISBN: 9780801885549
  • Page: 419
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Naturally identified with the Big Apple, New York City cabdrivers hold a special place in the American folk culture writ large Cabbies proverbially counsel, console, and confound, all the while flitting through the snarling traffic and bustling masses of the nation s largest city Variously seen as the key to street level opinion, a source of reliable information, or mystNaturally identified with the Big Apple, New York City cabdrivers hold a special place in the American folk culture writ large Cabbies proverbially counsel, console, and confound, all the while flitting through the snarling traffic and bustling masses of the nation s largest city Variously seen as the key to street level opinion, a source of reliable information, or mysterious savants who don t speak much English, the hacks who move New Yorkers have been integral to the city s growth and culture since the mid nineteenth century when they first began shuttling residents, workers, and visitors in horse drawn carriages Their importance grew with the introduction of gasoline powered cars early last century and continues to the present day, when than 12,000 licensed yellow cabs operate in Manhattan alone.Taxi is the first book length history of New York City cabdrivers and the community they compose From labor unrest and racial strife to ruthless competition and political machinations, this deftly woven narrative captures the people lower class immigrants for the most part and their hardscrabble struggle to capture a piece of the American dream Hodges tells the tale through contemporary news accounts, Hollywood films, social science research, and the words of the cabbies themselves.Whether or not you ve ever hailed a cab on Broadway, Taxi provides a fascinating new perspective on New York s most colorful emissaries.

    One thought on “Taxi!: A Social History of the New York City Cabdriver”

    1. No film set in New York City is complete without scenes of Manhattan traffic, dense with yellow cars -- the patrolling ranks of the cabs, shuttling a third of the city hither and yon. Taxi! is exactly as it describes itself, a social history of New York cabbing. The author begins in the early days of the automobile and moves forward to 2001. Much of it is predictable but as-yet unexplored, the tale of cabdrivers' woes throughout the economic turbulence of the 20th century, their struggling to ma [...]

    2. The book Taxi! by Graham Russell Gao Hodges discusses the origin of the Taxi up until the current days. The book mentions the different time periods that the Taxi has gone though, such as The Great Depression and World War II. They interview three cab drivers and their experiences as a cab driver, each one giving a different perspective about their experiences. I really enjoyed this book because I always see them but it never fazed me that there was so much history behind them. I would recommend [...]

    3. Even after living in nyc for years and taking cabs or carservices on a regular basis, I still have a romanticized notion of the cabdriver. This book only helped enable that notion for me.What an excellent example of micro grass roots history! While a little dry at times, the subject matter in and of itself is just awesome (well, at least in my opinion, obviously) and the bibliography is crazy - good crazy.

    4. While I probably now possess more knowledge than most about taxis in NYC. this book was okay. The text was somewhat dry at times and it seemed to me a mixed up chronology of events. It's chock full of information, if not a little biased.

    5. Really interesting book that I read in my New York City history course at Colgate, which Graham Hodges taught.

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