Second Acts: Presidential Lives And Legacies After The White House

Second Acts Presidential Lives And Legacies After The White House entertaining and illuminating The Washington Post ly accounts This engrossing book is Highly recommended for public libraries Library Journal for those interested in the former presidents this popula

  • Title: Second Acts: Presidential Lives And Legacies After The White House
  • Author: Mark K. Updegrove
  • ISBN: 9781592289424
  • Page: 301
  • Format: Hardcover
  • entertaining and illuminating The Washington Post.ly accounts.This engrossing book is Highly recommended for public libraries Library Journal for those interested in the former presidents, this popular history will do the trick Publishers Weekly.aling in detail and context Kirkus Reviews Mark K Updegrove s Second Acts is a smart and provocative l entertaining and illuminating The Washington Post.ly accounts.This engrossing book is Highly recommended for public libraries Library Journal for those interested in the former presidents, this popular history will do the trick Publishers Weekly.aling in detail and context Kirkus Reviews Mark K Updegrove s Second Acts is a smart and provocative look at the most exclusive club in America ex presidents Highly recommended Douglas Brinkley, Professor of History and Director of the Theodore Roosevelt Center at Tulane University

    One thought on “Second Acts: Presidential Lives And Legacies After The White House”

    1. This is an awesome book. Beginning with Harry Truman through Bill Clinton, the author writes about the Presidents after they left office. Their accomplishments, how they worked with each other, and their legacies make for interesting and truthfully, inspiring reading. I felt very happy when reading this book and then it dawned on me, Updegrove shows how even former enemies can become friends and partner to do good things. He also shows how men who were at the height of success (as President) can [...]

    2. Living in the era of Jimmy Carter, Global Peacemaker and the Bush/Clinton fundraisers I'd become curious about the lives of presidents out of office. This book was mentioned in one episode of the Stuff You Missed in History Class podcast, and shortly thereafter I promptly found a copy at Half Price Books. My three-star rating would suggest that I wasn't wholly satisfied with it and that's true. Much of the material covered by author Updegrove was familiar to me already. Yes, I'm more acutely int [...]

    3. The book is the only one the I'm aware of to really look at the strange position that former presidents hold. I've long been fascinated by the lives they've led after they left the White House, particularly Nixon (I could read a whole book about his post-presidency) and George H.W. Bush. Unfortunately, the book was good in places, but disappointing in others. The author seems not to be a serious historian and his claim to journalism fame was being the publisher of Newsweek, the LA manager of Tim [...]

    4. Before Truman, presidents received no pension from the government. Now, they get $186,000 a year, plus Secret Service protection, plus office expenses, etc. But that's just base pay for perks from the private sector. Reagan got $2 million for eight days of public appearances in Japan. Clinton made $10 million in 2006 from speeches.This book goes chapter by chapter from Truman to Clinton, and, while a clip-and-paste job and not that terrifically written, there are worthwhile tidbits. Nixon spent [...]

    5. Eh.I'm a presidential history dork, and in that regard I really enjoyed reading this book. Wonderful factoids--my two favorites were LBJ's hippie hairstyle post-presidency and Hillary's initial hitting on Bill in the Yale School library--but the writing is so sloppy that it makes this book a lot harder to recommend. The anecdotes from one chapter/presidency bleed into the next. Word choice is sloppy.It's a 4 star for information and 2-star for writing quality.

    6. This book reinforced what I already thought, that what ex-presidents do after their presidential term matters greatly. The services and agendas they pursue can be of great importance to the world. The author did a great job catching the essence of each presidents "second act" which made me wish (and sad) President Kennedy could have be afforded this as well. Easy read and entertaining.

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