The Iron Wolf and Other Stories

The Iron Wolf and Other Stories In this volume Richard Adams has collected together nineteen enchanting folk tales from almost as many parts of the world from Europe to China and from Polynesia to the Arctic Circle Each has a speci

  • Title: The Iron Wolf and Other Stories
  • Author: RichardAdams Yvonne Gilbert Jennifer Campbell
  • ISBN: 9780713913415
  • Page: 212
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In this volume, Richard Adams has collected together nineteen enchanting folk tales from almost as many parts of the world from Europe to China and from Polynesia to the Arctic Circle Each has a special magic, an aura that is sometimes beautiful and fascinating, sombre and frightening, or exciting and colourful But what unites all these stories is the essential qualityIn this volume, Richard Adams has collected together nineteen enchanting folk tales from almost as many parts of the world from Europe to China and from Polynesia to the Arctic Circle Each has a special magic, an aura that is sometimes beautiful and fascinating, sombre and frightening, or exciting and colourful But what unites all these stories is the essential quality of folk lore, something that transcends the boundaries of nations, of custom and time, that gives them their permanence and universality of appeal Authors need folk tales, Richard Adams says, in the same way as composers need folk song They re the headspring of the narrator s art, where the story stands forth at its simple, irreducible best They don t date, any than dreams, for they are the collective dreams of humanity In order to preserve as far as possible the immediacy and directness of authentic folk story telling, each of the nineteen tales is presented as being told by an imagined narrator to one or hearers at a particular time and place, sometimes past, sometimes present However, the reader is never told the identity either of the teller or his hearers, but is left free to infer both them and the occasion solely from the narrator s own words This original technique adds a novel dash of piquancy to this fine collection.

    One thought on “The Iron Wolf and Other Stories”

    1. This is a collection of retold folktales from around the world. Richard Adams is a very fine writer and the stories are well done. The only reason I didn't give it five stars is because of the frame system he chose to work in. Each folk tale is "told" by much more modern characters who are relating the tales to children or friends. In an effort to make the 'telling' seem realistic, there are occasional interruptions by life events, comments by the listeners etc. These interruptions are only seen [...]

    2. 19 fantasy folk tales collected from many lands and times entertain in originals. But author is no Scheherezade, so lowers, quibbles rating. Veddy British Richard Adams retells as silly cutesy pretentious narrators in phony ethnic dialects. Political incorrectness overflows in Esquimaut and round-eye devils. Plus, he shamelessly plugs his Watership Down novel. Paintings by Yvonne Gilbert of wildlife, peasants, and nobles flow with color and life more than drawings by Jennifer Campbell. Most mora [...]

    3. Richard Adams' retelling of a 19 folk tales from various cultures is. well, ok I guess. The stories themselves are varied in terms of country and culture of origin, and I appreciate what the author was trying to do by presenting each as a story told in the first person. One problem is that we never hear the interlocutor, so the narration is a little stilted (along the lines of "Do you want to hear a story? Oh, you do, do you?") and there's quite a bit of casual racism that would ensure the colle [...]

    4. The Iron Wolf is a real curio. The art by Yvonne Gilbert and Jennifer Campbell is stunningly beautiful and the short stories are entertaining, but the framing device Richard Adams uses for each one is utterly distracting. According to the dust jacket, 'in order to preserve the immediacy and directness of authentic folk story-telling, each of the nineteen stories is presented by an imagined narrator to one or more hearers at a particular time and place.' Sometimes all this amounts to is a brief p [...]

    5. One of my favorite books of all time.Oral traditions are meant to be organic. They should be intimate and personal. They should grow and change slowly over time and from teller to teller, yet retain their core. They should be passed on.Yet they can and do get lost if they are not written down. We live in a modern era with the written word and so many stories to know. There in lies the conundrum: Stories need to be told to stay alive, but they need to be written down so as not to be lost.Richard [...]

    6. This is Richard Adams at his weakest, which is a darn shame considering how utterly gorgeous the story art is. This could have well been one of my favorite short story collections had he been putting out his usual caliber of writing quality. One talent that I've always admired Adams for is how he can painstakingly recreate regional dialects in his characters' dialogue. In "The Unbroken Web", his portrayal of accents comes off as very. racist? Silly? Either way, uncomfortable. There's also an utt [...]

    7. I read this because I was curious about Adams's notion that on this lonely planet we are surrounded by a web of stories that are the same yet different. It is possible to catch on to a section of the web and pull down a story from it, then release it back to the surroundings. So in retelling trad stories they are the same and yet he changes them. Sort of a similar concept to the versions of Bible stories that appear repeatedly, such as the Gilgamesh legend. I rather liked his spin on the tales a [...]

    8. Lush color plates illustrate these fables that attempt to explain why things in the world are the way they are. Adam's conversational style is like listening to a tale spinner in front of a fire. The stories range from the Cat in the Sea, to the Chinese story of the Blind Boy and His Dog, to the Crimson Parrot of Nairobi and the Irish tale of the Mooddey Dhooese folktales span all the world.

    9. Watership Down was just a hard act to follow, no doubt about it. I have tried several of Adams's other work and I didn't like any of it. Sad. I'm sure these collected folk tales and fables were nice in their original form, but Adams makes them twee and pretentious and after the joy of WD, that's disappointing.

    10. A new take on old folk-tales and fables. By placing the narrator in the story"," Adams makes these his own. I haven't heard of most of these before"," but several are vaguely similar to fairy tales I do recall.

    11. Unlike others I didn't like the vehicle of the various narrators, but there were some stories that will stick to me for a long time -- which is why they persist and are still told after centuries.

    12. Ho la stessa versione in italiano. Credo che oggi sia introvabile. Molto belle le storie narrate. Ancora piĆ¹ belle le illustrazioni.

    13. Beautiful, spellbinding stories. Although marketed for younger readers, I think you need to be an adult to get all the innuendos - and understand all the different voices brought together in this.

    14. I saw this (London first edition) and lusted after it today at Books Unlimited on Broadway. It has the most incredible color illustrations.

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