Classics of Horror: Dracula & Frankenstein

Classics of Horror Dracula Frankenstein DRACULA is an epistolary novel by Irish author Bram Stoker featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula It was st published as a hardcover in by Archibald Constable Co Dra

  • Title: Classics of Horror: Dracula & Frankenstein
  • Author: Bram Stoker Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
  • ISBN: 9780681411630
  • Page: 390
  • Format: Hardcover
  • DRACULA is an 1897 epistolary novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula It was 1st published as a hardcover in 1897 by Archibald Constable Co Dracula has been assigned to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel invasion literature Structurally it s an epistolarDRACULA is an 1897 epistolary novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula It was 1st published as a hardcover in 1897 by Archibald Constable Co Dracula has been assigned to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel invasion literature Structurally it s an epistolary novel, told as a series of letters, diary entries, ships logs, etc Literary critics have examined many themes in the novel, such as the role of women in Victorian culture, conventional conservative sexuality, immigration, colonialism, folklore postcolonialism Altho Stoker didn t invent the vampire, the novel s influence on the popularity of vampires has been singularly responsible for many theatrical, film tv interpretations since its publicationANKENSTEIN or The Modern Prometheus is a novel about a failed artificial life experiment that s produced a monster, written by Mary Shelley She started writing the story when she was 18 It was published when she was 21 The 1st edition was published anonymously in London in 1818 Shelley s name appears on the 2nd edition, published in France in 1823 She d travelled the region in which the story takes place The topics of galvanism other similar occult ideas were themes of conversation among her companions, particularly her future husband Percy Bysshe Shelley The storyline was taken from a dream She was talking with three writer colleagues, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron John Polidori They decided they would have a competition to see who could write the best horror story After thinking for weeks about what her storyline could be, she dreamt about a scientist who created life was horrified by what he d made Then Frankenstein was written Frankenstein is infused with some elements of the Gothic novel the Romantic movement is also considered to be an early example of sf Brian Aldiss has argued it should be considered the 1st true sf story, because unlike in previous stories with fantastical elements resembling those of later sf, the central character makes a deliberate decision turns to modern experiments in the laboratory to achieve fantastic results The story is partially based on Giovanni Aldini s electrical experiments on dead living animals was also a warning against the expansion of modern man in the Industrial Revolution, alluded to in its subtitle, The Modern Prometheus It s had a considerable influence across literature popular culture spawned a complete genre of horror stories films.

    One thought on “Classics of Horror: Dracula & Frankenstein”

    1. All I want to say is that although this is the second time I read Frankenstein, it never fails at making me feel emotions such as rage, sadness, love. This is the only book which has made me cry.

    2. A re-read for me; I remember reading this book in my mid twenties, but appreciated it more this time round. The Victorian era was certainly the high watermark of British literature and storytelling. In this book we have two classic horror novels, which in my opinion neither film or TV adaptation has ever fully done justice to the books. Indeed, the written word of Dracula in particular, has at times, been totally forgotten in modern screenplays. These are as the title states two "Classics of Hor [...]

    3. I just rated the stories with three stars and I am already starting to feel guilty. There are the classics, the modern variations might be a better read in the 21st century, but they would never have been written if Dracula and Frankenstein had never existed. So please take your time and give it a chance. The classics deserve it.

    4. I struggled between three stars and four stars with these two books. Considering that they were written in the 19th century, and I don't read many novels from the 19th century, I have a feeling they were excellent novels in their time. But, given the context of the 21st century and the evolution of writing during that time, especially in the horror and science fiction drama, specifically the horror novels that I've read, these two would be more of a three star rating. Don't get me wrong, I think [...]

    5. I read Frankenstein first. This book I'd rate two stars. Slow start, but the fifth chapter was as good as promised. Terrifying premise, and very real. And then some of the later chapters switched to philosophical treatise, which wasn't as interesting. I skipped over a lot of those. The story of how this novel evolved was the amazing part; the author was only 18/19, Lord Byron challenged her and other writers to write a horror story, and she had this dream.The four stars of this review was really [...]

    6. this is for Dracula only. I'd rather save Frank for another day when I'm feeling this genre. I really loved the story. It was suspenseful and wonderfully written. I loved how Dracula was so gentlemanly and accommodating to Mr. Harker in the beginning of his stay at the castle. It was almost hard to see him as the villain. It was somewhat annoying though that Van Helsing seemed to go from a respected Dr. to a bit of a drama queen.Dec 5-6 2017so I finally read Frankenstein started a bit slow and b [...]

    7. Even though I didn't love either book that much I loved that they were combined in one volume here. The two books are just meant to be together.

    8. i think its a great story i like horror story and romance but my best is horror but if i started reading story the story!

    9. Both classics for very good reasons, these books should be read especially by people who are familiar with the stories only from the movies.

    10. I enjoyed Dracula much more than Frankenstein. Frankenstein was a slow start and a pretty quick wrapped up ending.

    11. I didn't read Frankenstein, too much of the same context and genre for me. Sometime I'll get to Shelley's book, but right now I need some modern romance.

    12. Read dracula first, finished it on Dec 1 2008. Started reading Frankenstein October 2011 and am now about half way done with it.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *